Kambaku: Where Legends Linger

This is not my own original story. This Bedtime story was provided by the friendly staff at Kambaku Safari Lodge in the Timbavati Nature Reserve.
Follow the link to read more about my South Africa Safari Adventure.

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Kambaku (c.1930-1985)

Origine of Name: Kambaku is the Tsonga word for “Great Tusker” or “Old Elephant Bull”

Range: This bull moved over a huge tract of country stretching from Satara/Orpen and the Timbavati to Crocodile Bridge.

Special Features: Kambaku’s left ear had a perfectly round hole in it close to the outer edge, and towards the end of his life he had no tail hairs. He was also recognized by the prominent markings on his trunk, which had the appearance of a round patch of smooth skin.

General: Kambaku was the third member of the Magnificent Seven. he was commonly seen by the rangers of the Kingfisherspruit area and was photographed by many visitors to the Kruger National Park. Uniquely unlike several of the other Magnificent Seven bull, Kambaku was always seen alone.

He was more than 55 years old when he was shot in the late 1985 by Regional Ranger Lynn van Rooyen from the Lower Sabie Ranger Section. The bull was in obvious pain from a bullet wound suffered during a foray across Crocodile River into a neighbouring sugar cane fields. The bullet penetrated his left shoulder, leaving a large wound, which eventually became septic. When he could no longer walk and it was clear that death was imminent, he was mercifully shot.

Kambaku’s tusks are on display in Krugar’s Letaba Camp Elephant Hall

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